Many people ask themselves, “Why do I feel depressed for no reason?”

The truth is that there is always a reason. They just don’t know what it is. The brain is a complex organ, and it takes a great deal of self-awareness to fully understand our thoughts and emotions.

Mild depression is quite common. We all have periods in our lives when we feel sad, and have trouble shaking it off. It may not seem like a big deal, but if we let mild depression fester, then it can diminish our health and quality of life.

Do you want to spend your precious time feeling down, or living life to its fullest?

Below I’ll discuss some of the common reasons why you may feel depressed, and then share with you some simple and effective tools for getting you out of your funk, and to help you develop the self-awareness and inner strength to prevent it in the future.

Why Do I Feel Depressed?

Understanding why you feel depressed is an important step to treating and preventing depression.

You don’t have to be a trained psychologist to figure out why you’re feeling sad. Sometimes, you just need to observe what is going on in your body, mind, and your life.

Here are some of the more common causes of mild depression:

Feeling Stress Out and Overwhelmed

Stress can be a major contributor to mild depression. Busy people have many commitments, such as work, family life, and extracurricular activities. All of these can leave you feeling stressed and overwhelmed.

The way stress contributes to depression is that when you’re so busy, you don’t have time to give your mind a rest. When this happens, your thoughts gain so much momentum that it’s almost impossible to slow it down. And when your mind is racing out of control, you begin feeling like you’re losing control of your life.

Physical Health Conditions

What is your body telling you?

There are various physical conditions that can lead to depression. One of them is Vitamin D deficiency. Studies have shown that approximately 42% of Americans are deficient in Vitamin D. The numbers are much higher among Hispanics and African-Americans, 69% and 82% respectively.

The solution for vitamin D deficiency is simple. Either get more of this vital nutrient through diet or supplementation, and get a little more sunlight.[1]

Changes in hormones can affect your mood. The changes may be due to thyroid function, menstrual cycle, and level of physical activity.

Exercise, in the short-term, can make you feel irritable. In the long-term, it can help you feel better about yourself.

Lack of sleep can also negatively affect your mood, and your ability to focus, which can also make you feel irritable. Maybe you’re not getting enough, or good quality sleep.

Read more: https://www.lifehack.org/832119/why-do-i-feel-depressed

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